About Joe Bridwell

Photographer, author, teacher with enhanced skill creating Award-Winning Photos. Joe uses Luminosity Masking and CFAM-Creating Fine Art Magic for his work!

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About Joe Bridwell

Photographer, author, teacher with enhanced skill creating Award-Winning Photos. Joe uses Luminosity Masking and CFAM-Creating Fine Art Magic for his work!

Color Synchronizing Sequential Luminosity Mask Images

by Joe Bridwell

In a recent blog, I presented an Edge of Light view of Red Mountain 1 near Silverton, Co. In reality, I actually shot 3 HDR images showing a motion time lapse of that edge of light moving down the mountain.
The most noteworthy image occurs when the edge of light moves down to tree line. We choose that final image and developed it with luminosity masking steps.

Red Mountain - First Edge of Light 2013©Chopawamsic LC

Red Mountain – First Edge of Light 2013©Chopawamsic LC

Here’s the final image…

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Red Mountain – Edge of Light

by Joe Bridwell

Twice each day, the cool, blue light of night interacts with warm tones of daylight.  For a full hour at either end of the day, colors of light mix together in endless combinations, as if someone in the sky were shaking a kaleidoscope.  

Magic Hour is that hour around dawn and dusk. The Edge of Light occurs when cool, blue light of night interacts with warm tones of daylight. This effect takes place, not directly where the sun rises or sets, but where sun’s rays bring warm, direct light onto parts of land and sky also lit by cool, reflected light of evening.

The most interesting parts of the natural world are these edges.  Places where timberline touches the heights, where bare mountain peaks touch the sky. Landscape photographers shoot light itself! When Magic Hour arrives, I search for perfect light. Then, I hunt for something earthbound to match.

Galen Rowell, Mountain Light, 2011, 3rd Ed.

Red Mountain - No Edge of Light 2013©Chopawamsic LC

Red Mountain – No Edge of Light 2013©Chopawamsic LC

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Eye Candy and Triple Play Luminosity Masking

by Joe Bridwell

Well before dawn, rain’s patter on the tent’s tarp seemed endless. But water was so precious in the dry sparse desert. I thought no more – sleeping on. Next morning’s wonder – rain drops formed a delicious reflection pool.
Not just any bland pool, but one whose still, glassy sheen repeated a prominent soliloquy of red and white sandstone. Mother Nature, conspiring with water and ancient sand, had capriciously melded red and white sandstones in a piquant spire – a candy snow cone. The shadowed gray companion seemed pale in comparison. Yet its contorted shape added mystery. She also knew a photographer would innately respond to such dramatic beauty.
This transient scene lasted several hours before the last drop of water fed that thirsty sand. The lone spire, now bereft of reflecting cohort, stood in elegant majesty – as it had for millennia…

Eye Candy 2013©Chopawamsic LC

Eye Candy 2013©Chopawamsic LC

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Twice Each Day…

by Joe Bridwell

More than one delectable ingredient is needed to brew a superb stew…

Let’s choose an inimitable mountain scene, mix with Magic Hour edge of light, then create luminosity masks as visual sauce to enhance fine art magic!

Twice each day, the cool, blue light of night interacts with warm tones of daylight.  For a full hour at either end of the day, colors of light mix together in endless combinations, as if someone in the sky were shaking a kaleidoscope. 

Magic Hour is that hour around dawn and dusk. The Edge of Light occurs when cool, blue light of night interacts with warm tones of daylight. This effect takes place, not directly where the sun rises or sets, but where sun’s rays bring warm, direct light onto parts of land and sky also lit by cool, reflected light of evening.

The most interesting parts of the natural world are these edges.  Places where timberline touches the heights, where bare mountain peaks touch the sky.

Landscape photographers don’t photograph objects, but rather light itself! Where there is remarkable light, they may have a remarkable picture. When Magic Hour arrives, I search for perfect light. Then, I hunt for something earthbound to match. The best images that result from this process look like visual riddles starting with the answer then working backward. A minute-and sometimes mere seconds-can make the difference between a superb image and a mundane one.

Galen Rowell, Mountain Light, 2011, 3rd ed.

Red Mountain Edge of Light 2013©Chopawamsic LC

Red Mountain Edge of Light 2013©Chopawamsic LC

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Mesa Arch ~ an International Photographic Icon…

by Joe Bridwell

From Mesa Arch Sunrise

People come from all over the world to Canyonlands, Utah, to shoot sunrise at Mesa Arch. Yet, I rarely see a picture which shows Washer Woman Arch, Colorado River breaks, and White Rim Sandstone.

Google recently changed its cover photo size. I searched through my Lightroom catalog to find a compelling image to use as a new CFAM cover image.

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